Learning (and altering) the D&D magic schools

Over the last two weeks I ran a short Dungeons & Dragons adventure using the Planescape setting. Planescape adventures normally involve travelling between different planes of reality, which often changes the effects of magic. The laws of a particular plane tend to alter whole schools of magic, so this has been a good excuse to brush up on the eight schools. (I’ll often be asked by a player what kind of magic is being used in a situation, and won’t be able to tell them.)

Schools of Magic

Abjuration magic is protective.

Conjuration magic summons things from other places.

Divination magic provides information.

Enchantment magic influences minds.

Evocation magic produces different kinds of energy.

Illusion magic deceives the senses of others.

Necromancy magic interferes with life and death.

Transmutation magic alters the nature of things.

Magical effects on Avernus

As I said earlier, the laws of various planes change the way magic works. There is a whole lot of material from Second Edition D&D that provides information about this, but it doesn’t all translate neatly into Fifth Edition D&D. Our short adventure today was set on Avernus, the first layer of Baator (similar to Dante Alighieri’s conception of Hell), so I had a look at the magical conditions described in Second Edition’s Planes of Law. This is how I adapted the conditions for our Fifth Edition adventure:

Abjuration and Transmutation

Because abjuration and transmutation magic alter the natural properties of things, both of these schools of magic are considered to be in conflict with the lawful alignment of the plane. I decided I would require a successful DC 15 Arcana or Religion check to cast an abjuration spell. (Arcana for an arcane spellcaster. Religion for a divine spellcaster.)

Conjuration

In Baator, conjuration spells require a ritual in order to bind any creature that has been summoned. I decided I would require a DC 15 Arcana or Religion check to determine the success of a binding ritual. If the binding was not successful, the summoned creature would be in control of it’s own actions, and would likely be pretty angry about being summoned to Baator…

Divination

Divination spells cast on Baator always show negative outcomes, with at least a grain of truth. Divination magic is also likely to attract the attention of baatezu (devils).

Enchantment and Illusion

Enchantment and illusion spells are not altered.

Evocation

Evocation spells may be altered depending on the layer and the kind of energy they produce. On the layer of Avernus, fire and earth energy are both more effective. I decided I would probably allow players to cast fire and earth spells as though they were at a higher level, but wasn’t totally sure if this would be appropriate.

Necromancy

Necromancy spells that grant healing require a successful DC 15 Arcana or Religion check. Necromancy spells that cause damage or pain; or that control undead, can function as though they are one level higher.

Wild Magic

Wild magic isn’t a school of magic, but it is effected by the lawful nature of Baator. I decided that the lawful nature of Baator would stop wild magic sorcerers from experiencing wild magic surges or from using any of their wild magic features.

First time DMing over audio stream

On Friday last week (so eight days ago now) I had my first attempt at running a D&D game over audio stream using Discord. (I have run a short game using Roll 20 before, but found it awkward to use on my small computer screen.) One of the things I was expecting was that it might be hard for players to avoid talking over each other. This happens enough when we’re sitting around a table playing, but it’s a much bigger problem over an audio stream. What’s been suggested to me by more seasoned streamers is that, over time, players tend to get better at sharing the stream and and that it can actually help encourage the players to be more attentive to each other’s characters, not just listening for their next opportunity to act.

One of the things I really enjoyed about the adventure happened close to the end, when a devil (we were playing a Planescape adventure and the adventurers had gotten stuck in Baator/Hell) asked our bard what friendship was, so the bard sung a terrible rendition of ‘You’ve Got a Friend in Me’ over the stream and made the devil cry. I like the idea that lower ranking fiends can be won over by beauty or kindness, but it will be interesting to see how that devil responds when more powerful devils show up.