Here’s the Chant: will-o’-wisps, ankhegs and cave halflings

For players or DMs:

For DMs:

For anyone wanting to reflect more deeply on game themes:

Content I’ve published recently:

#DungeonDrawingDudes: Week 3

For the last three weeks, I’ve been participating in the #DungeonDrawingDudes challenge. For each day in July, there’s a suggested Dungeons & Dragons creature to draw. If you have a look on Instagram, you can see what everyone’s contributed. I’ve put my contributions here, and you’re welcome to use them in your games if you like them.

This week I got a bit behind on the challenges because I was also working on miniatures for the penguin RPG I ran on Thursday and illustrations for an original roleplaying game a friend has been writing. So I did a lot of catching up today, and really enjoyed today’s challenges. I like running city-based adventures, so I enjoyed drawing the first of a number of urban creatures:

Wizard busker:

wizard busker

Tiefling street-performer:

tiefling street performer

Goblin cut-purse:

goblin cutpurse

I also appreciated the vegepygmy challenge, because it meant I read about a monster that I wasn’t familiar with, and it turned out to be fairly interesting. (They basically start off as a brown mould that could infect an adventurer.)

vegepygmy chief

Another monster that I hadn’t read much about, and appreciated the opportunity reflect on was the redcap, which I’ve already written about here.

I also enjoyed drawing the troll messhall cook, because I like drawing ‘monsters’ in incongruous ways that challenge us to think about them differently.

troll messhall cook

Subterranean fey and paranoia

On Sundays I’ve normally been posting some illustrations that can be used in tabletop roleplayng games like Dungeons & Dragons. Last week I asked what kind of fey creatures folks would like me to draw, and subterranean fey were chosen. So here are a couple of subterranean fey.

A korred:


A meenlock:


While I was drawing these, I was most interested by the meenlock. I hadn’t taken a lot of interest in them before, but I had a bit of a read about them in the original Fiend Folio and the more recent Volo’s Guide to Monsters. Meenlocks have an ability to promote paranoia in other creatures, by overwhelming them with fearful messages, to the point where they are actually transformed into meenlocks themselves.

This description reminded me of an experience I had on Facebook earlier in the year. I made a fake alt right profile for myself and joined some alt right groups. I started adding people I found in those groups as friends on this fake account. I found that my newsfeed was pretty quickly filled with vary fearful content (a lot of which seemed like fake news) and it was pretty easy to get sucked in and overwhelmed by the fearful messages. (I’m pretty sure I could have a similar experience if I made a fake extreme left account.) That experience called me to question the impact that my Facebook use was having on my mindset and curb my use.

Here’s the Chant: Sheep Lord, fungal fey and Amonkhet

On Wednesdays I normally post a roundup of content related to Dungeons & Dragons and roleplaying games in general. Here’s this week’s roundup:

For players or DMs:

For DMs:

For anyone who wants to reflect more deeply on gaming:

Content I’ve recently published:

Sheep Lord and Crab Lord

On Sundays I’ve normally been posting some illustrations that can be used in tabletop roleplayng games like Dungeons & Dragons. (This week’s is a bit late – our household’s on holidays from our common work, so I’m out of town for a few days.)

Last week I asked which animal lord folks would like me to draw. Particularly in the Planescape D&D setting, animals lords are almost like minor gods who protect various kinds of animals. I’ve been interested in using animals lords as ways to promote reflection on our relationships with animals. This week folks chose the sheep lord for me to illustrate:


I’ve also put together some statistics for the sheep lord, and for the crab lord that I drew as part of the #DungeonDrawingDudes challenge. If anyone gets to try these out I’d be keen to receive feedback.
Sheep Lord

Medium fey, neutral


STR 17 (+3) DEX 18 (+4) CON 16 (+3) INT 10 (+0) WIS 20 (+5) CHA 16 (+3)

CHALLENGE: 15 (13,000 XP)

ARMOR CLASS: 17 Natural Armor

HIT POINTS: 97 (13d8 + 39)

SPEED: 30 ft.

Saving Throws: STR +8, DEX +9, WIS +10, CHA +8

Skills: Intimidation +8, Nature +10

Damage Resistances: Bludgeoning, Piercing, and Slashing from Magic Weapons

Condition Immunities: Charmed, Exhaustion, Frightened, Paralyzed, Poisoned

Senses: Passive Perception 15

Languages: Telepathy 60 ft

Shapechanger. The sheep lord can use its action to polymorph into the form of a humanoid or into its sheep form. Its statistics are the same in each form. Any equipment it carries is not transformed. If slain, the sheep lord reverts to its sheep form.

Magic Resistance. The sheep lord has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects. 

Succession. A destroyed sheep lord will be succeeded by another sheep in 24 hours. The successor becomes a sheep lord and gains the memories of its predecessor. 

Spellcasting. The sheep lord is a 13th-level spellcaster. Its spellcasting ability is Wisdom (spell save DC 17, +9 to hit with spell attacks). The crab lord has the following druid spells prepared:

Cantrips (at will): shillelagh, druidcraft 

1st level (4 slots): charm person, detect poison and disease, entangle 

2nd level (3 slots): gust of wind, moonbeam, pass without trace 

3rd level (3 slots): conjure animals, meld into stone

4th level (3 slots): divination, plant growth

5th level (2 slots): geas, mass cure wounds 

6th level (1 slot): wall of thorns

7th level (1 slot): plane shift


Actions

Multiattack. The sheep lord makes one attack with its horns and one attack with its planar crook.

Horns. Melee Weapon Attack: +9 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 35 (9d6 + 4) bludgeoning damage and the target is grappled (escape DC 16).

Planar crook. Melee Weapon Attack: +11 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 6 (1d4 + 4) piercing damage and the target is grappled (escape DC 16). The crook can only be used to grapple small, medium or large creatures, and only one creature at a time. When a creature is grappled with a planar crook it cannot be transported to another plane. If it tries to do so, it is inflicted with 1d10+4 magical damage and must succeed on a DC 16 Constitution save or become unconscious. The sheep lord planar can only use the planar crook while in humanoid form.


Legendary Actions

The sheep lord can take 3 legendary actions, choosing from the options below. Only one legendary action option can be used at a time and only at the end of another creature’s turn. The sheep lord regains spent legendary actions at the start of its turn.

Attack. The crab lord makes one attack with its horns or planar crook.

Blinding Dust. Blinding dust and sand swirls magically around the sheep lord. Each creature within 5 feet of the sheep lord must succeed on a DC 16 Constitution saving throw or be blinded until the end of the creature’s next turn.

Bolster. The sheep lord bolsters all nonhostile creatures within 120 feet of it until the end of its next turn. Bolstered creatures can’t be charmed or frightened, and they gain advantage on ability checks and saving throws until the end of the sheep lord’s turn.

Description

The sheep lord can appear in sheep form or in the form of a horned, fleece-clad. The sheep lord is the protector of sheep or various kinds, and may also take responsibility for other herd animals. It makes its home on the Beastlands, but it could turn up wherever crabs are in trouble.
The crab lord is typically accompanied by a retinue of 2d20 + 10 sheep or goats and 1d12 + 2 giant sheep or goats.


Crab Lord

Large fey, neutral


STR 18 (+4)   DEX 10 (+0)   CON 17 (+3)   INT 16 (+3)   WIS 20 (+5)   CHA 16 (+3)

CHALLENGE: 15 (13,000 XP)

ARMOR CLASS: 17 Natural Armor

HIT POINTS: 97 (13d8 + 39)

SPEED: 30 ft. (swim 30 ft.)

Saving Throws: CON +8, INT +8, WIS +10, CHA +8

Skills: Intimidation +5, Nature +5

Damage Resistances: Bludgeoning, Piercing, and Slashing from Magic Weapons

Condition Immunities: Charmed, Exhaustion, Frightened, Paralyzed, Poisoned

Senses: Blindsight 60 ft, Passive Perception 15

Languages: Telepathy 60 ft


Shapechanger. The crab lord can use its action to polymorph into the form of a humanoid or into its crab form. Its statistics are the same in each form. In its crab form it uses a claw attack and in in its humanoid form it uses a crush attack. Any equipment it carries is not transformed. If slain, the crab lord reverts to its crab form.

Amphibious. The crab lord can breathe air and water.

Magic Resistance. The crab lord has advantage on saving throws against spells and other magical effects. 

Succession. A destroyed crab lord will be succeeded by another crab in 24 hours. The successor becomes a crab lord and gains the memories of its predecessor. 

Spellcasting. The crab lord is a 13th-level spellcaster. Its spellcasting ability is Wisdom (spell save DC 17, +9 to hit with spell attacks). The crab lord has the following cleric spells prepared:

  • Cantrips (at will): spare the dying, thaumaturgy 
  • 1st level (4 slots): command, sanctuary, shield of faith 
  • 2nd level (3 slots): hold person, silence, spiritual weapon 
  • 3rd level (3 slots): dispel magic, meld into stone
  • 4th level (3 slots): divination, control water 
  • 5th level (2 slots): dispel evil and good, geas 
  • 6th level (1 slot): forbiddance
  • 7th level (1 slot): plane shift

Actions
Multiattack. The crab lord makes one attack with its claw and one attack with its planar mancatcher.
Claw (Crush in Humanoid Form). Melee Weapon Attack: +9 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 35 (9d6 + 4) bludgeoning damage and the target is grappled (escape DC 16). The crab lord has two claws (or two arms in humanoid form), but one is large and the other is small. Only the larger one can be used to attack or grapple.

Planar Mancatcher. Melee Weapon Attack: +11 to hit, reach 10 ft., one target. Hit: 6 (1d4 + 4) piercing damage and the target is grappled (escape DC 16). The mancatcher can only be used to grapple small, medium or large creatures, and only one creature at a time. When a creature is grappled with a planar mancatcher it cannot be transported to another plane. If it tries to do so, it is inflicted with 1d10+4 magical damage and must succeed on a DC 16 Constitution save or become unconscious.

 

Legendary Actions

The crab lord can take 3 legendary actions, choosing from the options below. Only one legendary action option can be used at a time and only at the end of another creature’s turn. The crab lord regains spent legendary actions at the start of its turn.

Attack. The crab lord makes one attack with its claw or planar mancatcher.

Blinding Dust. Blinding dust and sand swirls magically around the crab lord. Each creature within 5 feet of the crab lord must succeed on a DC 16 Constitution saving throw or be blinded until the end of the creature’s next turn.

Whirlwind of Sand (Costs 2 Actions). The crab lord magically transforms into a whirlwind of sand, moves up to 60 feet, and reverts to its normal form. While in whirlwind form, the crab lord is immune to all damage, and it can’t be grappled, petrified, knocked prone, restrained, or stunned. Equipment worn or carried by the crab lord remain in its possession.
Description

The crab lord can appear in crab form or in the form of a large, armored humanoid. In humanoid form it has one large, muscular arm and one small, weak arm. The crab lord is the protector of crabs or various kinds, and may also take responsibility for other crustaceans. It makes its home on the Beastlands, but it could turn up wherever crabs are in trouble.

The crab lord is typically accompanied by a retinue of 2d20 + 10 crabs and 1d12 + 2 giant crabs.

#DungeonDrawingDudes: Week 1

For the last week I’ve been participating in the #DungeonDrawingDudes challenge. For each day in July there’s a suggested Dungeons & Dragons creature to draw. If you have a look on Instagram, you can see what everyone’s contributed. I’ve put my contributions here, and you’re welcome to use them.

One thing I’ve realised so far is that it’s a lot more sustainable to be sticking to black-and-white line drawings – especially when I have other illustration projects I need to be working on. I think it’s also meant I’ve been able to be more reflective.

On day one I decided to draw the crab warrior as a crab lord. (Animal lords can be important in Planescape, so I’ve been keen to work out how to approach them. I’ve also got to come up with a sheep lord over the weekend.) I’ve also been working on stats for a crab lord on D&D Next, but I’ve been finding it difficult – the platform’s still got some problems. I’ll probably post what I’ve come up with here over the weekend.

Crab Lord

On day two when I was thinking about how to approach the pirate’s mimic, the obvious approach was to portray it as a treasure chest. That’s how these monsters normally disguise themselves. But I wondered about drawing a mimic disguised as a boat? I imagined adventurers trying to escape a pirate ship and jumping into the lifeboat, only to realise it has sharp teeth. It should be no surprise that this also got me thinking about the fear Australian society seems to have about boats, hiding the fact that many of us came here by boat ourselves.

pirate's mimic - Drawing 1_1

On day three I drew a wereshark, which I’ve already reflected on here.

On day four I drew an anemone monster, and came up with some thoughts about how to use it in an urban setting like Planescape’s Sigil. What I was thinking was that folks might be getting these creatures installed on their roofs to deter feral pigeons, but that they might also be up to something sinister…

anemone monster - Drawing 2

On day five I did a search to see how other folks had approached kraken priests, and I ended up coming across China Miéville’s novel Kraken, which I’m now enjoying reading over the weekend.

kraken priest - Drawing 1_1

 

Genesis and weresharks

Sunday to Wednesday I was in a class on Indigenous Theologies and Methods, which NAIITS (North American Institute for Indigenous Theological Studies) was running here through Whitley College. One of the things we spent a lot of time discussing was the differences between how Western Christians have read the Bible and how the Bible might be read from Indigenous cultural perspectives. One particular emphasis that our teacher Terry LeBlanc (a Mi’qmac man from Canada) noted was the tendency for Western Christians to focus on the rupturing of creation in Genesis 3 and overlook the goodness of creation in Genesis 1-2. His suggestion was that rather than Genesis 3 being an ultimate fall from perfection, it is more like a break in relationship between people, God, spirits and fellow creatures.

At the same time I’ve been participating in the #DungeonDrawingDudes challenge for July. Each day there’s a Dungeons & Dragons creature to draw, and Tuesday’s challenge was a wereshark, which I really enjoyed drawing.


@bodieh, who lives in Western Australia (where the government has encouraged the culling of sharks) is one of the organisers of the challenge, commented on this one. I wondered whether this wereshark might be looking for former Western Australian premier Colin Barnett? I wondered whether we should be paying attention to what sharks may be trying to say to us, rather than culling them? It certainly seems unfair to me that we would venture into their natural environment and then kill them when they attack us.

Here’s the Chant: Planescape factions, dragon totem barbarians and frogs

On Wednesdays each week I’ve been posting a roundup of content related to Dungeons & Dragons and other roleplaying games. Here’s today’s roundup:

For players and DMs:

  • D&D Beyond – the second and third stages of beta testing are now live, which means you can create characters, manage campaigns and publish some forms of homebrew. I’ve enjoyed seeing how this is eveloping, but there are still some problems – it’s beta testing. (The main problems are with being able to edit homebrew items after they’re saved or published, and I’m sure those problems will be ironed out.)
  • ‘Eberron turns Thirteen’ Keith Baker – the creator of the Eberron campaign setting reflects on the thirteenth anniversary of the setting’s first publication, and answers some players questions about the setting

For players:


Godsman illustration: Tony DiTerlizzi

For DMs:

Content I’ve published:

Are kobolds really evil?

On Sundays I normally post some illustrations of creatures that can be used in tabletop roleplaying games like Dungeons & Dragons. (Because last week was really busy in our household and this week I’ve been doing an intensive class, I haven’t been able to post as often as I have been, but I’m posting some illustrations now.) Folks on Twitter voted for me to draw some kobolds this time, so here are a kobold dragonshield and a kobold inventor:


I drew a winged kobold earlier in the year. Having reflect on them a bit, I’m not convinced that they should be considered lawful evil. In Volo’s Guide to Monsters they’re described as being willing to sacrifice themselves so that other members of their tribe might escape their enemies. It seems like the main reason that they’re considered to be evil-aligned is because they tend to come under the sway of evil dragons and other evil creatures. I’m not saying that they should be considered good-aligned, but I wonder if they should be considered lawful neutral or true neutral?

A couple of other things I’ve been wondering about have been elderly kobolds and the lost kobold god Kurtulmak. Volo’s Guide says that while most kobolds are short-lived, some live up to 120 years old. I wonder what kind of abilities such an elderly kobold would have?

I was also thinking that it would be interesting to run an adventure involving kobolds trying to free Kurtulmak from the maze where he’s imprisoned. Since I’ve been running Planescape adventures recently, I thought it could be interesting to change the Kurtulmak’s story a bit and have him trapped in the Lady of Pain’s maze in the city of Sigil – perhaps due to gnomes’ trcikery.

Here’s the Chant: ooze characters; 5e spells for Spelljammer and Eberron

For players:

For players and DMs:

  • ‘A Guide to Oozes, Slimes and Jellies’ Power Score – a roundup for ooze content from all editions, including monsters, non-player characters and player character options. I’ve done a drawing of the oozemaster:

For DMs:

For anyone wanting to reflect more deeply on RPGs:

Content I’ve published this week: