D&D player character race options

Even though I run 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons games most weeks, I don’t know all the rules that well. For that reason I’ve just been reading over the Player’s Handbook again. Tonight I’ve been particularly looking over the player character race options. I find that players will have questions for me about their race or class features. Often I can’t answer them because I don’t play as a player character often so I’m not familiar with the races and classes. These are my notes about what I think I need to remember about the player race options in the Player’s Handbook. I haven’t paid as much attention to proficiencies or ability score increases, because I presume players will have these added on their character sheets.

Dwarves

As a dungeon master I need to remember that all dwarves have advantage to saving throws against poison as well as resistance against poison damage. Since a lot of people seem to play as dwarves, I don’t find this is hard to remember.

Elves

Because elves also seem to be a very popular option, I find their features are pretty easy to remember. Elves have advantage on saving throws against being charmed and they can’t be put to sleep by magical means. Elves also don’t need sleep. I find that this feature is really easy to remember because if there’s an elf in the party they will often mention it whenever the party rests

There’s a lot of variance in the elf subraces. High elves gain one wizard cantrip. Wood elves can hide when they are obscured by a natural phenomenon. Dark elves are sensitive to sunlight and gain specific spells at at 1st, 3rd and 5th levels.

Halflings

Even though halflings are one of the most common races, I think I’ve only ever had one regular player choose to play as a halfling, so I’m less familiar with their traits. It’s easy to remember that halflings can reroll attacks and saving throws if they roll a 1. I haven’t always remembered that they can also move through the space of any creature that is larger than them.

The halfling subraces don’t have as much variance as the elf ones do, and I think they should be easy to remember because they are similar to abilities from other races. Lightfoot halflings can hide whenever they are obscured by another creature that is at least one size larger than them, similar to the wood elf’s hiding feature. Stout halflings have advantage to saving throws against poison as well as resistance against poison damage, just like dwarves do.

Humans

I personally think humans are the least interesting player race option. They don’t have any features that make them stand out, other than a boost to all of their ability scores or the variant option that allows for a feat. The party I’m dungeon mastering for does not currently contain any humans, and I’ve rarely had any players who wanted to play as humans.

Dragonborn

As a dungeon master, the main thing I need to remember about dragonborn characters is that they gain a breath weapon (which recharges after a short of long rest) and a damage resistance based on the kind of dragon they are descended from. Since the breath weapon is going to be one of their most effective attacks, I find that players normally become familiar with this feature pretty quickly.

Gnomes

Gnomes are probably my favourite race option, at least among those in the Player’s Handbook. All gnomes have advantage on Intelligence, Wisdom and Charisma saving throws against magic.

Both of the gnome subraces in the Player’s Handbook have a couple of features that I think are important to remember. Forest gnomes can cast minor illusion and can also communicate with small animals. Rock gnomes can add their proficiency bonus twice to any Intelligence (History) check related to magical, alchemical or technological objects. Rock gnomes can also use their tool proficiency to make a few different kinds of simple mechanical items.

Half-elves

If you’re familiar with the features of elves, it’s not hard to remember the features for half-elves. Like elves, half-elves have advantage on saving throws against being charmed and they can’t be put to sleep by magical means.

Half-orcs

When a half-orc character drops to 0 hit points but isn’t immediately killed by the damage they’ve taken, they can instead drop to just 1 hit point – but this can’t be repeated until after a long rest. Half-orc characters also get to add another extra damage die whenever they make a critical hit.

Tieflings

Tieflings have resistance to fire damage, and they gain specific spells at 1st, 3rd and 5th levels just like dark elves do.

Having read over these racial features and summarised them, I feel a lot more confident with them and I’ve been surprised at how much was already pretty familiar. Next I’ll probably have a look at some of the class features, because there are some that I’m not currently confident about.